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Liberia, South Carolina : an African American Appalachian community / John M. Coggeshall.

Available copies

  • 3 of 3 copies available at NC Cardinal. (Show)
  • 2 of 2 copies available at Buncombe County Library System.

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0 current holds with 3 total copies.

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Location Call Number / Copy Notes Barcode Shelving Location Status Due Date
Black Mountain Library 305.896073 COG (Text) 0020511899237 Adult Nonfiction Available -
Pack Memorial Library Ref N.C. 305.896073 COG (Text) 0020513007250 North Carolina Room Adult Reference Available -

Record details

  • ISBN: 9781469640846
  • ISBN: 1469640848
  • ISBN: 9781469640853
  • ISBN: 1469640856
  • Physical Description: xii, 269 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2018]

Content descriptions

Bibliography, etc. Note:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Formatted Contents Note:
Shifting paradigms: understanding the Liberia community -- Your zip your lips: life in slavery -- The times ahead are fearful: the late nineteenth century -- The Whites got the best: the early ... Read More
Summary, etc.:
"In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia, in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable ... Read More
Subject: Clarke, Mable Owens.
Clark family.
African Americans > South Carolina > Liberia > History.
Appalachians (People) > South Carolina > Liberia.
Appalachian Region, Southern > Race relations.
Liberia (S.C.) > History.
Summary: "In 2007, while researching mountain culture in upstate South Carolina, anthropologist John M. Coggeshall stumbled upon the small community of Liberia, in the Blue Ridge foothills. There he met Mable Owens Clarke and her family, the remaining members of a small African American community still living on land obtained immediately after the Civil War. This intimate history tells the story of five generations of the Clarke family and their friends and neighbors, chronicling their struggles through slavery, Reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, and the desegregation of the state. Through hours of interviews with Mable and her relatives, as well as friends and neighbors, Coggeshall presents an ethnographic history that allows a largely ignored community to speak and record their own history for the first time"--

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